How to Solve Your Java Performance Problems (Part 2)

In the first part of this post, we explained the Performance Diagnostic Methodology (PDM) and how to use it. But, the proof of the pudding is in the eating and therefore it is now time to apply the methodology. Of course, the best proof would be to apply the methodology to a real world performance issue, but instead of waiting for that, we will try to simulate some performance issues and verify whether the methodology can work.

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How to Solve Your Java Performance Problems (Part 1)

Last June I saw an interesting conference talk at J-Spring given by Martijn Verburg (from jClarity) about the Performance Diagnostic Methodology (PDM), a structured approach in order to find the root cause of Java performance problems. In this post I will try to highlight the key concepts but I do recommend watching a recording of the talk from Devoxx UK. In the next part of this post, we will try to apply the theory to some problem applications.

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J-Spring 2018 impressions

On Thursday the 31st of May I went to the J-Spring conference at Utrecht, the Netherlands. J-Spring is the largest one day Java conference in the Netherlands in the spring organised by the NLJUG (Dutch Java User Group). The title of the event might be a bit misleading as you may think that it is only about Pivotal’s Spring, but it is more than that. In this post I want to share my experiences that day.

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Project Lombok: Reduce boilerplate code

In this post we will take a look at Project Lombok and what it has to offer us. Project Lombok reduces boilerplate code by making use of annotations in your code. Main advantage is achieved with POJO’s (Plain Old Java Objects): you don’t have to code getters and setters anymore. Although your IDE provides the possibility to generate getters and setters, with Project Lombok you also don’t have to read them anymore. Source code used in this post can be found at GitHub.

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Spring Boot Actuator in Spring Boot 2.0

In this post we will take a closer look at Spring Actuator and highlight some changes of it in Spring Boot 2.0. We will discuss some of the endpoints and will create a custom endpoint to our application. The sources can be found at GitHub.

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Spring WebFlux: Getting started

This post will be about how I got started with Spring WebFlux. A few weeks ago, I started to read in detail about Spring WebFlux, Reactive Streams, etc. Looking back at my journey, I did things in the wrong order. In this post I have tried to structure the information, in order to give you a plan for getting started with Spring WebFlux. The examples can be found on GitHub. Continue reading “Spring WebFlux: Getting started”

Maven git commit id plugin

Did you ever had the problem that you did not know which version of your application was deployed on e.g. a test environment? Or you had to manually adapt version information for each release in order to make it available in an About-dialog? Then the Maven git commit id plugin comes to the rescue! In this post, we will build a Spring Boot application with a RESTful webservice for retrieving versioning information. The only thing we will have to do, is to configure the Maven git commit id plugin and create the webservice. After this, versioning information is automatically updated during each build!

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